Popular Career Paths for Entomology and Nematology Graduates

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Popular Career Paths for Entomology and Nematology Graduates

Entomology and nematology are comprehensive scientific fields that provide a wide range of career paths and work environments, including government agencies, research laboratories, the military, postsecondary institutions and field research. By completing a master’s degree or graduate certificate in entomology and nematology, you’ll develop an in-demand skill set and expand your access to a diverse array of related occupations, including the jobs listed in this article.

These career options will require an educated, motivated workforce to take on crucial entomological and nematological research and improve our understanding of the relationship between insects and the environment, the connection between pathogens and our overall environment and the most effective ways to allocate resources.

According to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, each of the career options highlighted below enjoys a higher median salary than the overall national median and has a higher estimated employment growth rate than the 5 percent average for U.S. occupations overall.

Four Popular Career Paths in Entomology and Nematology

  1. Environmental Economist
    Entomology courses in vector-borne diseases focus on various pathogens and how aspects of the environment, host and vector biology influence pathogen transmission. This allows future environmental economists to understand how pathogens influence the natural environment (e.g., water, air and soil), which ultimately affects humans, wildlife and agriculture. Environmental economists earn a median salary of $104,340 and have a projected ten-year employment growth rate of 10 percent.

  2. Industrial Ecologist
    Insect ecology courses empower aspiring industrial ecologists to understand fundamental ecological principles crucial to the development and application of insect pest management and insect conservations. Lessons from these courses can help industrial ecologists develop techniques for efficient systems and maximize the use of natural resources. Industrial ecologists earn a median salary of $71,130 and have a projected ten-year employment growth rate of 10 percent.

  3. Biologist
    Biologists apply their critical thinking skills toward improving relationships between insects and their environment. Courses in insect biology teach future biologists to identify urban and agricultural pests and prevent or mitigate the environmental damage they cause, based on their biological attributes. Biologists earn a median salary of $77,550 per year and have a projected ten-year employment growth rate of 6 percent.

  4. Management Analyst
    Management analysts can leverage their expertise in entomology to help major corporations or government agencies improve public health policies and natural environments. Completing coursework in biological invasions can inform analysts of the top global invaders and help them develop the critical thinking skills needed to assess biological threats. Management analysts earn a median salary of $83,610 per year and have a projected ten-year employment growth rate of 11 percent.

Before committing to an entomology degree program, it’s essential to understand how your prospective degree can enhance your practical skill set and provide you with growing career prospects in a variety of industries. Earning a master’s degree or graduate certificate in entomology and nematology involves an investment of both your time and finances, but can lead to a lucrative career in a fascinating and constantly evolving field.

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